How to Hardwire Your Dash Cam to Your Fusebox

Hardwiring your dash cam is an essential installation to enable the parking-mode feature found on your dash cam. By hardwiring your dash cam to the fusebox, your vehicle will be protected from battery discharge and provide constant power and continue recording even after leaving your vehicle.

The Charger Plus Hardwire Kit is a power management device that keeps your dash cam continuously running after your engine is turned off. The Charger Plus monitors your vehicle’s battery status and cuts power off to prevent battery discharge. The Charger Plus comes with low voltage protection settings, timer protection and over current/surge protection

WARNING: Improper installation and handling may cause serious damage to your vehicle. GRDIAN is not liable for any mishandling and damages resulting from this guide. Install at your own discretion. Consult your car technician if you continue to have issues. GRDIAN cannot provide help, instructions or recommendations beyond this guide. Please follow each step accordingly to ensure safe installation.

Tools Checklist

Before you begin, below is a list of tools you will need to properly install your hardwire kit.

Charger Plus Hardwire Kit
Multimeter
Crimp Tool
x2 Fuse (Size will depend on your vehicle)
x2 Add-a-fuse (Size will depend on fuses used)

Step 1 Locate your fusebox and battery

Battery
On most vehicles, the location of the battery is typically located in the engine bay or in the trunk.

Fuse Box
Locate the fuse box using your Fuse Box Diagram. This information can usually be found in your vehicle’s User Manual or from your manufacturer’s website.If your vehicle has multiple fuse boxes, choose one that is easily accessible.

Step 2 Test your battery's health

Measure your vehicle’s battery before you begin. To get an accurate reading of your battery, we recommend letting your vehicle sit idle for at least 1 hour to get the “resting voltage”. A healthy battery should read 12.6V or 24.6V. If your battery reads below 11.6V or 23.6V the hardwire kit may not work for you.

Step 3 Locate and test a proper ground point

Grounding your wire is crucial to the safety of yourself and your vehicle in the event of a short circuit. The chassis of your vehicle generally makes a good ground. However, vehicles today are built with a combination of metals, spot welds, glued together uni-body panels and isolated chassis components. Therefore, we cannot assume that a good ground will automatically be on the chassis.

In most vehicles you should be able to locate an obvious ground near the fuse box. Your owner's manual may tell you where the factory ground is. If you are unable to locate a ground point, there 2 ways to test a good ground point.

Continuity Test

  1. Set your multimeter to Continuity Test or 200 ohms.

  2. Using the black (negative) lead, touch the negative terminal of your vehicle’s battery and then place the red (positive) lead on to your ground point. Your multimeter should beep if it is a complete path. If it does not beep, look for another ground.

Resistance Test

  1. Set your multimeter to Resistance Mode or Diode Check.

  2. Using the black (negative) lead, touch the negative terminal of your vehicle’s battery and then place the red (positive) lead on to your ground point. You will want to look for something less than .2 ohms.

Step 4 Locate a Constant and switched fuse

What is the difference between a constant and switched fuse? A constant fuse is always live/hot at all times. This means that it receives power around the clock even when the vehicle is turned off. A switched is the opposite and is only receives power when the vehicle is turned on. Please note that some vehicles maintain power a couple minutes after shutdown. We recommend opening your doors/trunk and let it sit for ~30 minutes. Upon returning, avoid opening/closing any doors or turning on anything.

NOTE: Avoid fuses over 10A and fuses that are relative to car safety (brake lights, cooling fan, ECU, SRS, etc).

Constant Fuse

  1. Set your multimeter to DCV.

  2. Use the black lead to touch your vehicle’s chassis or your ground point.

  3. Place the red lead on both ends of the fuse. The multimeter should read 12V.

Switched Fuse

  1. Set your multimeter to DCV.

  2. Use the black lead to touch your vehicle’s chassis or your ground point.

  3. Place the red lead on both ends of the fuse. The multimeter should read ~0V.

Step 5 Line and Load side

In the step we will be checking to see which side your constant and switched fuse is line and draw. This is a crucial step so that we insert the add-a-fuse in the correct direction.

How to Determine Line and Load Side

  1. Turn on ONLY your vehicle’s electrical system.

  2. Set your multimeter to 20 DCV.

  3. Remove either your constant or switched fuse and insert your add-a-fuse into the empty fuse slot. (You will repeat the same steps for the other fuse)

  4. With the black lead touching your ground point, test for line side by placing the red lead on the bottom left slot of your add-a-fuse. It should read 12V.

  5. With the black lead touching your ground point, test for load side by placing the red lead on the bottom right slot of your add-a-fuse. It should read 0V.

  6. If the above is the case, you have located the line side of your fuse and have placed your add-a-fuse in the correct position. If not, remove and place the add-a-fuse in reverse. Repeat steps 4 & 5 to test. Test both slots again to make sure the left bottom slot reads 12V and the right bottom slot reads 0V.

  7. Repeat the steps above for the other fuse.

Step 6 Setting up your Add-a-fuse

Your Add-a-fuse

Your add-a-fuse will have 2 slots. The original fuse should be inserted on the bottom, while the new fuse should be inserted at the top. When inserting, the new fuse should be lower value than the original fuse.

add-a-fuse.jpg

Step 7 Connecting Your Add-a-fuse to your hardwire kit

Now that we have determined a ground point, our constant and switched fuses, and the line and load side, the next step is to connect the add-a-fuse to the hardwire kit.

BATT+ (Yellow)

  1. Attach the BATT+ (yellow) wire to your add-a-fuse by using a crimping tool.

  2. Once attached, plug the add-a-fuse into your constant fuse. Make sure to insert the add-a-fuse in the right direction with the load side to load side.

ACC+ (Red line)

  1. Attach the BATT+ (yellow) wire to your add-a-fuse by using a crimping tool.

  2. Once attached, plug the add-a-fuse into your switched fuse. Make sure to insert the add-a-fuse in the right direction with the load side to load side.

GND (Black)

  1. Secure the GND wire to your ground point.

Step 8 Test the Connection

NOTE: Part of this portion is specific to the Charger Plus Hardwire Kit.

  1. Test the connection by connecting your car charger to the cigarette socket. Your camera should turn on. If not, please re-check the connections and go through the steps again.

Step 9 Setting the Correct Voltage Setting

The Charger Plus is equipped with voltage protection settings to help minimize battery discharge by cutting off power output to the dash cam when the voltage drops below the set threshold.

How do I setup a value that fits my vehicle?

  1. With the dash cam unplugged, use a multimeter to check your vehicle’s battery voltage. Do so when the engine has been shutoff for 5~10 minutes. Take note of the voltage.

  2. Now measure the voltage with the dash cam plugged in. Your engine should still be shutoff. Note the voltage.

  3. Set the Voltage Protection Setting based on your findings. For example: If the multimeter detects 12.5V without the dash cam and 12.2V when dash cam is plugged in, you should set the voltage setting to 12-11.8V at least 0.2V lower when the dash cam is plugged in.

NOTE: Make sure you set the correct voltage setting or your dash cam may keep rebooting.

Troubleshoot

My dash cam does not power on.

  • Make sure that you are inserting the add-a-fuse in the right direction, with the load side to load side.

  • Make sure you are using the correct fuse. (BATT+ to a constant fuse and ACC+ to a switched fuse)

  • Set the voltage protection setting to a lower value.

  • Check your battery’s health. The battery should not be lower than 11.6V or 23.6V

My dash cam keeps turning on and off.

  • Make sure you set the correct voltage setting or your dash cam may keep rebooting. Once installed, check the camera if its operating normally. If your dash cam keeps rebooting you may need to set a lower threshold. If you continue to have issues, have your battery checked by a professional.